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Specifying an equivalent product
20.01.2016  |  
Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, recently penned an in-depth article for leading industry title ABC&D about the impact of specifying an equivalent product. She looked at the role it could play on the aesthetics, green credentials and quality of a project and the repercussions for manufacturers who have invested...
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Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, recently penned an in-depth article for leading industry title ABC&D about the impact of specifying an equivalent product. She looked at the role it could play on the aesthetics, green credentials and quality of a project and the repercussions for manufacturers who have invested time and money in order to get their products specified, only to be substituted for an inferior product.

The article has been picked up by ABC&D’s sister publication, Buildingtalk, and featured prominently on its website and e-newsletters. To read the full article, click here.

Here’s some selected highlights:

“When specified products and materials are substituted for alternatives, there is usually no opportunity for recourse from architects or manufacturers. In many cases, the complexion of a project can change quite dramatically due to such substitutions, without architects ever being informed – especially if the substitute products look identical to those specified.”

“When specifying a piece of glass, an architect might recognise, for example, that a satin finish glass can readily accumulate fingerprints. Knowing this, the architect might specify a polymeric resin coating in order to save on cleaning costs across the lifecycle of the building. However, a procurement manager might not be aware of the reason why that particular product was specified and could seek to save initial costs by choosing a cheaper, non-coated equivalent product. This would lead to increased operational and maintenance costs and worse performance across the lifecycle of the building.”

“To protect and maintain the trust between manufacturers and contractors that ensures a healthy supply chain, there must be transparency and clear communication when any specification is not followed exactly.”

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The future of Innovation
29.04.2016  |  Joanna Lush
Our Business Development Manager, Joanna Lush, recently contributed to two articles on Innovation for Design Insider Live about the technology that will drive change for manufacturers in the built environment.   To read the full articles, click here and  here.
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Our Business Development Manager, Joanna Lush, recently contributed to two articles on Innovation for Design Insider Live about the technology that will drive change for manufacturers in the built environment.   To read the full articles, click here and  here.

 

Providing an industry voice
12.01.2016  |  Karla Lopez
Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, was recently asked by the British Contract Furnishing Association to provide expert comment for a feature in its annual Design Insider directory. The comment was for a piece on the rise of social media in business and below is what Joanna had to say.
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Design Insider

Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, was recently asked by the British Contract Furnishing Association to provide expert comment for a feature in its annual Design Insider directory. The comment was for a piece on the rise of social media in business and below is what Joanna had to say. If you want to connect with us on social media, you can follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Pinterest

“Alongside producing a quality product, having good lead times and accurate costings, you have also got to be able to get your name out there and get people to see what you are doing. Having previously worked in the digital industry I can see the benefits of having strong social media skills and transferring them to a more traditional manufacturing setting.

“Social media is not about making a hard sell, it is more about brand awareness. It is about making sure we have the right infrastructure in place so that we can respond to people and do it correctly, and also ensuring that both our IP and that of our clients is being used properly.

“As a business we are increasingly getting feedback from customers through social media and so many different platforms to choose from. For instance, we have been thinking about whether we should start putting together video content telling customers more about what we do.”

Tips for designers entering the job market
22.07.2015  |  Karla Lopez
Our Business Development Manager, Joanna Lush, was invited recently by the BCFA to attend the 30th edition of the New Designers show. While there, she shared her knowledge and experience with young designers wanting advice on getting into the job market.
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Our Business Development Manager, Joanna Lush, was invited recently by the BCFA to attend the 30th edition of the New Designers show. While there, she shared her knowledge and experience with young designers wanting advice on getting into the job market.  In this blog, Joanna shares seven top tips that she gave to the students during the event.

 1 – First Impressions:  Have a good firm handshake and focus on the person you’re having a conversation with;  a limp handshake is quite offputting and it’s courteous to offer someone your full attention.

 2 – You and  your product are not the same thing: Selling your products online shows entrepreneurial spirit -  you may have 200 likes on your product page on Facebook or a 100 reviews on Etsy, but they are not a substitute for a CV or portfolio.  A CV or Portfolio showcases you, your brand, skills and talent  - and is the snapshot of you a potential employer will see.  Make them imaginative, personal, and use them to contextualise your online presence and achievements.

 3 - Show your thought process: It is always great to see final ideas but it is also interesting to understand how you got there, what was your process? Sketches, prototypes - they all show how you think and aspects of what you can offer to your future employer.

 4 - Be consistent: Brands are consistent – you’d recognise a Coca Cola ad anywhere, wouldn’t you?  Use  a consistent look over your social media platforms and CV so people can identify your work.

 5 - Research, research, research: What careers does your chosen course lend itself to? Who are the big players in the industry you want to go into? Do they have grad schemes? What do they look for in a potential employee? Do the research, make a plan.

 6 - Be specific, not generic: When a company wants to talk to a potential customer one to one a generic message won’t suffice – it’s personal. If you’ve done your research then you can send a covering letter to the right person, and refine your portfolio to cater to the areas which that company deals with.

 7 - Protect your IP: Your original designs are yours and you should be aware of what laws and regulations protect your designs –  make sure that you know your patent from your trademarks and from your copyright.

 For further information on gaining employment the BCFA have created this handy guide:

http://www.thebcfa.com/res/BCFA_Student_Guidelines_on_Employment2.docx

 

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A glimpse of the future at New Designers
09.07.2015  |  Karla Lopez
Last week saw the 30th edition of the New Designers show at the Business Design Centre in London, and we were invited by the BCFA as part of their Student Clinic to impart wisdom to some of the country’s most talented young designers.
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A glimpse of the future at New Designers

Last week saw the 30th edition of the New Designers show at the Business Design Centre in London, and we were invited by the BCFA as part of their Student Clinic to impart wisdom to some of the country’s most talented young designers.

Promising graduates from the UK’s leading design courses booked appointments with industry professionals from differing backgrounds, from Marks & Spencer to Gensler.  Our Business Development Manager, Joanna Lush, gave advice on how to market yourself to stand out in the crowded job market and shared her experience of how manufacturers work with designers across a multitude of disciplines.

Joanna said: “It was a really rewarding experience and great to see first-hand the exciting talent that this country is continually producing. I’m looking forward to seeing how they will continue to progress the discipline of design over the coming years.”

Next week, we’ll be publishing an article by Joanna which distils some of her advice to students for marketing not just their work, but also themselves. 

BCFA Student Clinic

 

Adapting for BIM
30.09.2015  |  Joanna Lush
Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, recently contributed to a round table discussion for Building Products Magazine about the impact of BIM and how Gx Glass have approached adopting the technologu.  She talked about how the decision to adopt BIM objects was taken and the role BIM will play now...
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Our business development manager, Joanna Lush, recently contributed to a round table discussion for Building Products Magazine about the impact of BIM and how Gx Glass have approached adopting the technologu.  She talked about how the decision to adopt BIM objects was taken and the role BIM will play now and in the future for manufacturers and their customers.   To read the full article, click here.

Here’s some selected highlights:

“The need for BIM from an environmental, time, cost, and data management perspective is well documented, and our audience comprises both contractors and specifiers. We can only see positives from our products being available in the BIM format, so that they can be dragged into specs and drawings, which is great for us.  If BIM does what it has set out to do, then why would we not want our products available at a click of a button?”

"BIM has been created to standardise information and make a coherent, single object to represent a building. However, there isn’t a sustainability system for buildings or product and material certification in the UK or globally that can slot neatly into or alongside BIM."

New lease of life for old samples
12.09.2013  |  Joanna Lush
At Gx Glass one of the ways people review and choose from our product range is by viewing samples, and we produce hundreds and hundreds each year - from our standard float glass through to our metallic and sparkle backpainted finishes.
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At Gx Glass one of the ways people review and choose from our product range is by viewing samples, and we produce hundreds and hundreds each year - from our standard float glass through to our metallic and sparkle backpainted finishes.

We don't always sell all of the samples we produce, so every so often we have a big clear out of the sample racks, and recycle the glass along with our other offcuts.  The thing is that the samples are pretty cool - lots of fun colours, and the size we produce work perfectly as coasters, so we thought we'd upcycle this next lot instead of recycling them.

So for the last week we've been beavering away making Tea and Coffee coasters - which we'll be giving away as a little 'thank you for your enquiry' present at 100& Design.  We'll also be attaching a wee booklet about our products to the back, which then tears off to leave you with the glass coaster. 

We also hope to have some more news about our 'operation upcycle' next month too - so watch this space. 

 

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